Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Ovulation’

There are many factors that contribute to the signs of infertility. Some are:
• Venereal diseases
• Genetic abnormalities caused by environmental poisons
• A deficient diet
• Stress
• Low sperm counts or abnormal sperm
• Hormonal imbalances

Progesterone and infertility are linked through the Pill which can result in temporary infertility after having stopped taking it. Hormone imbalances induced by environmental poisons are a major factor in the infertility of many people. It is also vital for a woman to keep her body fat above 20% of her total weight, otherwise menstruation will cease.
One of the least known but commonest causes of infertility is a lack of progesterone during the second half of the monthly cycle. This is known as a ‘defective luteal phase’.

For pregnancy to occur oestrogen first builds the lining of the uterus, then after ovulation the role of progesterone is to thicken that lining ready for the fertilized egg. Inadequate progesterone reduces fertility.
Research into the causes of infertility has shown that often conception occurs in a fertile woman only to be followed by failure of the egg to embed itself in the lining. A lack of progesterone and infertility go hand in glove as this hormone is vital for pregnancy, but if the interval between ovulation and menstruation is too short (less than 12 days) it means that not enough progesterone has been produced. This could result in a miscarriage as early as the next menstruation.

So, you could be fertile whilst showing all the signs of infertility!

Read Full Post »

Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is the most prevalent reproductive problem in young girls and women. Women with polycystic ovarian syndrome have:

  • Insulin resistance, which in turn leads to weight gain, blood sugar problems, high triglycerides and high androgens;
  • High blood sugar level (leading to high insulin, which leads to high androgens. High androgens lead to excess hair, weight problems, acne, suppression of ovarian function, leading to anovulation
  • High triglycerides which lead to heart disease;
  • Low progesterone levels (as ovulation does not take place, so only half the cycle is being completed);
  • High levels of 5-alpha reductase (this converts oestrogen to androgens. Progesterone inhibits 5 alpha reductase).

If insulin resistance is reversed, insulin levels drop, this in turn lowers androgen levels, which in turn prevents the suppression of ovarian function, allowing the ovaries to start functioning normally.

The common treatment for PCOS is the contraceptive Pill (to prevent ovulation) and Metformin (a diabetic drug to bring down sugar levels).
The Pill contains synthetic progesterone and oestrogen, which stop ovulation, but also reduce the level of natural progesterone. Synthetic progesterone or ‘progestins’ increase insulin resistance.

It is crucial that the insulin resistance is reversed before ovarian function returns to normal.

Support for PCOS:

  • Reduce insulin levels – eat organic protein (with no growth hormones), avoid all starchy carbs, including fruit, eating only the non-starchy leaves, shoots, sprouts etc
  • Reduce androgen levels – use progesterone and avoid all food which converts to glucose, to reduce insulin, which causes androgens to rise
  • Use between 200-250mg/day of progesterone cream, this helps stabilise blood sugar and suppresses androgen production. It also helps to correct ovarian malfunction
  • The B vitamin inositol is essential for the reversal of insulin resistance
  • The amino acid L-glutamine is very helpful. It’s best dissolved in water and drunk throughout the day. The brain can use it in place of glucose for energy, so it stops all binging, tiredness, cravings for sugary foods and alcohol, it heals the lining of the gut, it boosts the immune system and is the most abundant amino acid in the muscles, so helping with muscle weakness
  • Have a homocysteine test, if It’s high, take:
    • 150mg B2-riboflavin
    • 75mg B6-pyrodoxine
    • 1000mcg B12-cyanocobalamin
    • 1200mcg Folic acid
    • 3000mg TMG-tri-methyl glycine (anhydrous)
    • 20mg Zinc

As homocysteine could be a contributing factor to polycystic ovarian syndrome, a blood test should be carried out. If the results are higher than 6 then it is essential to take the following nutrients:

  • 150mg B2-riboflavin
  • 75mg B6-pyrodoxine
  • 1000mg B12-cyanocobalamin
  • 1200mcg folic acid
  • 3000mg TMG-tri-methyl glycine (anhydrous)
  • 30mg zinc

Read Full Post »

It’s a common problem when you hit 30 that despite your best efforts you just can’t seem to lose the extra weight around your middle.  Medical research proves you’re not alone – the average person gains one to two pounds a year after the age of 30, usually around the stomach area. 

Hormone imbalance spejcialst, Dr C W Randolph’s book ‘From Belly Fat to Belly Flat’  explains the real reason behind this problem which has less to do with calories and everything to do with a little-known medical problem known as ‘oestrogen dominance’. 

Readers of my blogs will know that I’m an advocate of natural progesterone – an essential hormone for both men and women – fostering a calming effect on the body; maintaining libido; serving as a natural antidepressant; promoting regular sleep patterns; stimulating bone building and opposing oestrogen’s predisposition to promote cell growth, thereby providing protection from uterine, breast and ovarian cancer.

If you want to know more about progesterone and, particularly, its effect on weight gain and how to lose that belly flab then check out Dr Radolph’s book: ‘From Belly Fat to Belly Flab’ by Dr C W Randolph and Genie James

Read Full Post »