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Posts Tagged ‘ovaries’

Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is the most prevalent reproductive problem in young girls and women. Women with polycystic ovarian syndrome have:

  • Insulin resistance, which in turn leads to weight gain, blood sugar problems, high triglycerides and high androgens;
  • High blood sugar level (leading to high insulin, which leads to high androgens. High androgens lead to excess hair, weight problems, acne, suppression of ovarian function, leading to anovulation
  • High triglycerides which lead to heart disease;
  • Low progesterone levels (as ovulation does not take place, so only half the cycle is being completed);
  • High levels of 5-alpha reductase (this converts oestrogen to androgens. Progesterone inhibits 5 alpha reductase).

If insulin resistance is reversed, insulin levels drop, this in turn lowers androgen levels, which in turn prevents the suppression of ovarian function, allowing the ovaries to start functioning normally.

The common treatment for PCOS is the contraceptive Pill (to prevent ovulation) and Metformin (a diabetic drug to bring down sugar levels).
The Pill contains synthetic progesterone and oestrogen, which stop ovulation, but also reduce the level of natural progesterone. Synthetic progesterone or ‘progestins’ increase insulin resistance.

It is crucial that the insulin resistance is reversed before ovarian function returns to normal.

Support for PCOS:

  • Reduce insulin levels – eat organic protein (with no growth hormones), avoid all starchy carbs, including fruit, eating only the non-starchy leaves, shoots, sprouts etc
  • Reduce androgen levels – use progesterone and avoid all food which converts to glucose, to reduce insulin, which causes androgens to rise
  • Use between 200-250mg/day of progesterone cream, this helps stabilise blood sugar and suppresses androgen production. It also helps to correct ovarian malfunction
  • The B vitamin inositol is essential for the reversal of insulin resistance
  • The amino acid L-glutamine is very helpful. It’s best dissolved in water and drunk throughout the day. The brain can use it in place of glucose for energy, so it stops all binging, tiredness, cravings for sugary foods and alcohol, it heals the lining of the gut, it boosts the immune system and is the most abundant amino acid in the muscles, so helping with muscle weakness
  • Have a homocysteine test, if It’s high, take:
    • 150mg B2-riboflavin
    • 75mg B6-pyrodoxine
    • 1000mcg B12-cyanocobalamin
    • 1200mcg Folic acid
    • 3000mg TMG-tri-methyl glycine (anhydrous)
    • 20mg Zinc

As homocysteine could be a contributing factor to polycystic ovarian syndrome, a blood test should be carried out. If the results are higher than 6 then it is essential to take the following nutrients:

  • 150mg B2-riboflavin
  • 75mg B6-pyrodoxine
  • 1000mg B12-cyanocobalamin
  • 1200mcg folic acid
  • 3000mg TMG-tri-methyl glycine (anhydrous)
  • 30mg zinc

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I have treated many women for infertility and have helped them to conceive – it can be an emotionally exhausting condition – not to mention expensive.  Thanks to reflexology, a growing number of couples are discovering that this is a key to overcoming infertility.

Reflexology, a traditional healing art dating from the ancient Egyptians and Chinese, involves manipulation of pressure points in the hands and feet and is often used to ease period pain, headaches, sinus and back problems as well as the effects of chemotherapy.

The soles of the feet are like a mini map of the inside of the body and are linked to our inner organs and systems, including the fallopian tubes, ovaries and the endocrine system. Pressure on the different points on the feet unblocks energy pathways in the body enabling it to regain its natural balance and therefore start to heal itself.

Specific points on the feet are associated with a woman’s egg production and others are related to endocrine (hormone) glands (pituitary, pineal, hypothalamus, ovaries etc important in conception and pregnancy) and by manipulation of these areas can correct the imbalances which hamper conception.

The latest research in this subject is a two year clinical trial at the IVF unit at Derriford Hospital in Plymouth.

In the new study, 150 volunteers will be offered reflexology rather than the fertility drug clomifene, which is usually used to induce ovulation. This drug works in about 70 per cent of patients, but the drug’s main drawback is it can increase the likelihood of a multiple pregnancy.

The volunteers will each receive eight treatments over a two to three month period. In order for the trial to be conducted in a scientific way, patients and hospital staff will not know whether true reflexology or a ‘dummy’ version has been given. Only the reflexologist will know who has had the real treatment.

One in seven couples suffers with infertility. Last year the Plymouth IVF unit saw over 900 patients. Thirty per cent of these were not producing eggs.

Infertility is a complex problem and often what is needed is a ‘kick-start’ to the system and reflexology can do this.  In my experience, reflexology, along with acupuncture/acupressure, hormone balancing advice (ie natural progesterone cream, diet, vitamins and minerals)  is very effective and I have successfully treated many women and have helped them conceive and have seen them right through their pregnancies.

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It’s a common problem when you hit 30 that despite your best efforts you just can’t seem to lose the extra weight around your middle.  Medical research proves you’re not alone – the average person gains one to two pounds a year after the age of 30, usually around the stomach area. 

Hormone imbalance spejcialst, Dr C W Randolph’s book ‘From Belly Fat to Belly Flat’  explains the real reason behind this problem which has less to do with calories and everything to do with a little-known medical problem known as ‘oestrogen dominance’. 

Readers of my blogs will know that I’m an advocate of natural progesterone – an essential hormone for both men and women – fostering a calming effect on the body; maintaining libido; serving as a natural antidepressant; promoting regular sleep patterns; stimulating bone building and opposing oestrogen’s predisposition to promote cell growth, thereby providing protection from uterine, breast and ovarian cancer.

If you want to know more about progesterone and, particularly, its effect on weight gain and how to lose that belly flab then check out Dr Radolph’s book: ‘From Belly Fat to Belly Flab’ by Dr C W Randolph and Genie James

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The link between progesterone and the menopause is highlighted by the fact that women in industrialised countries have a hard time with menopausal symptoms compared to women in rural societies. Dr. P. Ellison of Harvard University studied oestrogen levels in various ecological and cultural populations and found that oestrogen levels in western women are abnormally high. This can be due to a number of factors:

  • the food consumed (particularly animals fed oestrogen to fatten them)
  • the crops sprayed with pesticides (most of which are oestrogenic)
  • the Pill and HRT
  • drinking recycled water which has not had the oestrogen removed
  • using cosmetics which are made with liquid paraffin and oestrogenic antioxidants.

An understanding of the effects of a lack of progesterone is vital to understanding that progesterone can play an enormously beneficial role in helping to go through menopause without too many adverse affects. By naturally opposing the action of oestrogen, the symptoms of oestrogen dominance are lessened and in some cases eliminated. The easiest method to apply progesterone is in a cream form.

New research conducted by Wallace and Kelsey published in “Human Reproduction”, indicates that it might be possible to show the approach of menopause by a scan of the ovaries. Currently blood hormone levels are used to try to determine this, but these are notoriously inaccurate as it is common practice to only check oestrogen levels, not progesterone. The patient generally needs to specifically request this despite the fact that progesterone and menopause are inextricably connected. As the symptoms of menopause are caused by a lack of progesterone and too much oestrogen, the standard ‘oestrogen only’ test is of little help.

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