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Posts Tagged ‘IBS’

It is estimated that fibromyalgia affects nearly 1 in 20 people across the globe. In England and Wales, there could be up to 1.76 million adults with fibromyalgia.
Anyone can develop fibromyalgia, although the condition affects more women than men. In most cases, fibromyalgia occurs between 30 and 60 years of age, but it can develop in people of any age, including children and the elderly.
Fibromyalgia can be a difficult condition to diagnose because there is no specific test and the symptoms can be similar to those of other conditions.
I see a number of clients in my clinic with fibromyalgia and, in my experience, there seems to be a link between this condition and hormone imbalance (ie polycystic ovaries, endometriosis etc) and also a link with depression.
My clinic and the way I practise is multi-faceted, tailoring the treatment to the individual, but I find that Reflexology particularly helps with the symptoms of fibromyalgia. What many people don not realise is that Reflexology is a powerful treatment which works the body from the inside out – working every system and organ of the body to bring about homeostasis (balance) to the body.
Why does it work so well with fibromyalgia? Well this could be for a number of reasons:
Reflexology:
• Promotes the reduction of pain through gate control and stimulation of the production of endorphins (the body’s natural painkillers) – it therefore reduces pain. Pain reduction following reflexology treatment is documented in 27 studies including research showing impact on individuals of all ages and health states;
• Offers further pain relief by promoting blood flow: studies show that reflexology increases blood flow to the feet, brain, kidneys and intestines;
• Creates relaxation: From the moment the reflexologist’s hands start their work, the relaxation begins as shown in research using EEG brain activity. All together, 24 studies demonstrate reflexology’s relaxation effects;
In common with most complementary therapies, there has only been limited research aimed at validating reflexology – but there have been 100s of studies and a survey of 170 studies showed a positive result for 83% of areas researched.
A Chinese survey of 8,096 case studies noted a 94% effective or significantly effective rate. Significant areas of study include: stress and anxiety, lessening of pain and cancer care as well as general health concerns for individuals of all ages.
Further, a randomised controlled study on MS patients showed significant decreases in intensity and duration of parasthesia and urinary symptoms together with an improvement in spasticity. There was also a borderline improvement in muscle strength. This is even more remarkable as some of the pharmacological agents used are associated with muscle weakness.
Out of all my treatments, I absolutely love Reflexology because I see the power, and the effects, of this amazing treatment the minute my clients get down off the therapy couch!

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CELEBRATE THE START OF BRITISH SUMMER TIME 

AND THE START OF A NEW YOU!

I meet people all the time who are longing to try complementary therapies – maybe reflexology, acupuncture, Indian head massage, hypnosis – but have never felt brave enough to take the first step, or have just not found the time.

I offer a variety of therapies, which I tailor to individually suit the client, at my London and Hertfordshire practices.

I’m holding an Open Evening on Sunday 27 March to give people the opportunity of free tasters and a chat about what may be right for them.

Pop in any time bewteen 4pm-8pm – and bring a friend!

Venue:  Teddy George, 684 Goffs Lane, Goffs Oak, Hertfordshire, EN7 5ET.  

Time:  4pm-8pm

Why not come along, have a free taster session, ask questions, join our raffle for a free treatment and pick up a voucher for £5 off your first treatment (but only if you like what you see!)

I promise a genuinely warm welcome, a free glass of wine and some personal advice on what might be right for you.

Tel:  078796 12870

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January Special Offers: Book one treatment and get another half price

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Stress is different to pressure.  Cary Cooper, Professor of Organisational Psychology and Health (Lancaster University) states:  ‘Pressure is motivating but stress is when the pressure exceeds your ability to cope’.  1 in 5 people suffer from work-related stress; if we add to this equation the pressure of home and social life, then it’s not surprising many of us are pushed to the limit.

When we get stressed, the hormone, adrenaline is released and so causes other hormones, namely, noradrenaline and cortisol to be released.  These three hormones together divert resources to the parts of the body which are needed most – this is the ‘fight or flight’ response.  The problem is that in the 21st Century we’re not hunting for our food, we are not dealing with the odd sabre-tooth tiger attack we are dealing with sitting in traffic jams, dealing with bad news, work and family problems, but our bodies do not recognise the difference: stress is stress.  This means we are constantly being exposed to a level stream of stress chemicals but there is nowhere for them to go when we’re sitting anxiously in a traffic jam – there is no release for these toxic chemicals!

Typical signs of stress include: lack of concentration, IBS and digestive problems, frequent colds and flu, tiredness, heart disease and even cancer.

If you can, identify what’s causing you stress.  Exercise is a very good way of reducing stress levels and the best thing you can do for your health.   Zinc and the B-complex vitamins are also very good for combating the effects of stress.  Ginseng is an adaptogen so it increases the body’s resistance to stress and Rhodiola can help improve focus and concentration under stressful conditions.

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